Lately I’ve been following a lot of the home automation technology that has been coming out and I think it’s pretty fascinating. This is a project that I’ve been really excited about, especially because I have two pets of my own.

Petcube is a home gadget that lets you watch, talk and play laser games with your pet via mobile app. From your phone, you’ll be able to call to your pet, control the laser with a video game-esque joystick, and take and share photos and videos of your furry friends. The best part is that they plan on putting some of the first Petcubes in animal shelters, which would have public access feeds so anyone can play with parentless pets. Petcube has been funded through Kickstarter and the first batch of gadgets will be available in May 2014. I’m looking forward to seeing how this product evolves and how it will eventually connect with or inspire other pet related devices.


I recently came across this trailer for Monument Valley, an “M.C. Escher-esque” game that where architecture is the main character. 
To me the game looks really fun and explorative and it’s beautifully designed. The idea of turning the work of M.C. Escher into a game mechanic, is creative, and at least from my knowledge no one has made such a concept into a game.

According to its creators ustwo:

"The easiest way to explain Monument Valley to people is to say it’s a bit like an interactive M.C. Escher artwork. While the game as it now stands draws inspiration from many artists, films and photographs, Escher played a key role in finding what the game was about.

The team and I spent a few months sketching up ideas for mobile games that we felt hadn’t been explored yet by anyone else. Of the ideas we discussed, Monument Valley really struck a chord with the team and the rest of the studio, so we started work on a prototype. The games team is a perfect storm of imagination, workmanship and the desire to create meaningful experiences in video games. What’s really worked well is not having a solid distinction between programming and art. Several of us can do both, which is perfect when trying to create a game that lies at the intersection of art and mathematics.”

If you want to learn more about the game, check out this interview that ustwo’s Ken Wong did with FormFiftyFive where he talks about his inspiration for design and lots more.

Spike Jonze’s latest movie “Her” was probably the best film I saw in 2013 but it also made me leave the theater with much to think about. “Her” is the unlikely yet completely plausible love story about a man who falls in love with his operating machine. If this profound existential difference doesn’t worry Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix), it’s because isolation is his default state. Everyone around him seems more plugged in to their machines than to other people. As a result, the machine or voice (Scarlett Johansson) becomes his lifeline to the world, despite that she is just software.

It’s inevitable that our world is changing, and a future where technology is taking over our lives is a future that’s so familiar and enveloping, that it occasionally feels like we’re already there. By the end the of film, it made me wonder whether machines might not only be capable of love, but more capable than the human beings that created them. 

In contemporary experience time has become so compressed that concerns for the past and present are often eclipsed by the urgency of now. Events that took years, months or days now unfold over the course of hours, minutes and sometimes seconds; and objects which were once scarce and crafted now fall off the production line in droves.
In 2011, artist Heidi Voet created the carpet, Is six afraid of seven/ ‘ cause seven, eight, nine/I’m about to lose the pieces I find using 4,000 digital wristwatches, woven into a beautiful and elaborate pattern. All of the watches were set to the same time and same alarm. Over the course of the expedition, the watches inevitably malfunction, losing their synchronicity and eventually sounding out of rhythm. Voet was inspired by an excerpt from the text ‘Beautiful because it is brief’ by Maya Kramer which is about how convenient and industrialized items available to us becomes a distraction to our experiences.

In contemporary experience time has become so compressed that concerns for the past and present are often eclipsed by the urgency of now. Events that took years, months or days now unfold over the course of hours, minutes and sometimes seconds; and objects which were once scarce and crafted now fall off the production line in droves.


In 2011, artist Heidi Voet created the carpet, Is six afraid of seven/ ‘ cause seven, eight, nine/I’m about to lose the pieces I find using 4,000 digital wristwatches, woven into a beautiful and elaborate pattern. All of the watches were set to the same time and same alarm. Over the course of the expedition, the watches inevitably malfunction, losing their synchronicity and eventually sounding out of rhythm. Voet was inspired by an excerpt from the text ‘Beautiful because it is brief’ by Maya Kramer which is about how convenient and industrialized items available to us becomes a distraction to our experiences.

Check out this amazing illustration series "Reflexions Faites" (Make Reflections) by Paris-based illustrator Romain Trystram. These digital illustrations are gorgeous. Everything from the geometric cityscapes to the use electric color gives of this very 80s neonoir feel. According to his Behance portfolio, this is “visual development for a short.” I’m definitely looking forward to seeing these images come to life. 

Check out this amazing illustration series "Reflexions Faites" (Make Reflections) by Paris-based illustrator Romain Trystram. These digital illustrations are gorgeous. Everything from the geometric cityscapes to the use electric color gives of this very 80s neonoir feel. According to his Behance portfolio, this is “visual development for a short.” I’m definitely looking forward to seeing these images come to life. 

I haven’t seen a lot of fresh approaches to the fish-out-of-water concept in film in awhile. Typically, when a character experiences a heavy loss, their world slows down and therefore the pace of the film slows down. As much as I enjoy these types of films, I have trouble relating to them based on my own experiences. Last night I watched the movie “Charlie Countryman” and was pretty blown away. At its core, the movie is a love story between two lost, damaged souls and the antagonist between them. Both characters are drowning in sorrow and confusion, and in desperate need to find a connection, even if it comes in a hallucinatory state and trumps all their logic and sanity. I was mostly impressed with the utilization of many editing choices that give the film a dreamy and vibrant look. This along with a very energetic music score performed by Moby, M83 and Sigor Ros form a quixotic state that grips you for the film’s entire running time. It’s easy to pick at flaws in the movie. But the best way to enjoy it (I found) is to not judge it by its imperfections but instead focus on the overall visual style. This was something very different and interesting that I strongly recommend watching. 

Artist Chris LaPorte drew this amazing photorealistic piece called “City Band” with over 100 2H pencils and roughly 1,200 hours of drawing time. It began when LaPorte discovered an 80-year-old photograph of his grandfather’s high school marching band while rummaging through his mother’s basement. He used the piece as inspiration for the drawing that now spans 13 x 26 feet. This piece is currently being displayed at the GRAM in Grand Rapids.

Artist Chris LaPorte drew this amazing photorealistic piece called “City Band” with over 100 2H pencils and roughly 1,200 hours of drawing time. It began when LaPorte discovered an 80-year-old photograph of his grandfather’s high school marching band while rummaging through his mother’s basement. He used the piece as inspiration for the drawing that now spans 13 x 26 feet. This piece is currently being displayed at the GRAM in Grand Rapids.

I love this poster called "Untranslatable Words" by Irish illustrator Fuchsia Macaree. Untranslatable words are pretty much self-explanatory: they are the type of words that don’t necessarily translate directly into English or perhaps require a degree of cultural understanding to truly get their meaning. Fuchsia did a fantastic job bringing all of these great words to life - each one rendered with beautiful colors and fun and playful imagery. My favorite in the one I included here for the Scottish word “Tartle.”

I love this poster called "Untranslatable Words" by Irish illustrator Fuchsia Macaree. Untranslatable words are pretty much self-explanatory: they are the type of words that don’t necessarily translate directly into English or perhaps require a degree of cultural understanding to truly get their meaning. Fuchsia did a fantastic job bringing all of these great words to life - each one rendered with beautiful colors and fun and playful imagery. My favorite in the one I included here for the Scottish word “Tartle.”